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The Wage Gains of African-American Women in the 1940s

dc.contributor.authorBailey, Martha J.
dc.contributor.authorCollins, William J.
dc.date.accessioned2004-10-06T19:07:54Z
dc.date.available2004-10-06T19:07:54Z
dc.date.issued2004-06
dc.identifier.citationBailey, Martha J. and William J. Collins. "The Wage Gains of African-American Women in the 1940s." Working Paper No. 04-W16. Dept. of Economics, Vanderbilt University. Nashville, TN, June 2004.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/29
dc.description.abstractThe weekly wage gap between black and white female workers narrowed by 15 percentage points during the 1940s. We employ a semi-parametric technique to decompose changes in the distribution of wages. We find that changes in worker characteristics (such as education, occupation and industry, and region of residence) can account for a significant portion of wage convergence between black and white women, but that changes in the wage structure, including large black-specific gains within regions, occupations, industries, and educational groups, made the largest contributions. The single most important contributing factor to the observed convergence was a sharp increase in the relative wages of service workers (where black workers were heavily concentrated) even as black women moved out of domestic service jobs.en
dc.format.extent203957 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherVanderbilt University. Dept. of Economicsen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking Paper
dc.titleThe Wage Gains of African-American Women in the 1940sen
dc.typeWorking Paperen


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