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The Importation, Adaptation, and Creolization of Slave Leisure Forms in the Americas: 1600 to 1865

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dc.contributor.advisor Landers, Jane G.
dc.contributor.author Doster, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned 2009-06-12T19:09:39Z
dc.date.available 2009-06-12T19:09:39Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1803/3101
dc.description This paper examines the creolization of various slave leisure activities from the most easily cross-culturally transportable (i.e., storytelling and dance), to forms that required special apparatuses or venues (e.g., horseracing). A PowerPoint presentation is also included. Written for MLAS 270 33: New Methods, New Discoveries, and New Interpretations in Slavery Studies with Prof. Jane Landers, Spring 2009. en
dc.description.abstract Leisure, the escape from the tedium of everyday existence, is found in all cultures including those in which slavery exists. At first glance the terms "slavery" and "leisure" may seem to be contradictory, mutually exclusive terms. However, the need to mentally and physically break the bonds of one's circumstances, albeit temporarily, applied equally if not more so to Caribbean and North American slaves of African descent. The creolization of slave leisure activity forms began almost immediately upon their arrival in the Americas, some of which represented a continuation of African traditions while others were adopted from white society. A few forms of leisure even afforded slaves an opportunity to elevate their status relative to that of fellow slaves, compete on an equal footing with whites, and in some instances win their freedom. This paper will examine the creolization of some forms of slave leisure activities from the most easily cross-culturally transportable, to forms that required special apparatuses or venues. It is not intended to be an exhaustive inquiry into all forms of slave leisure. The time period covered will be from the earliest days of the transatlantic slave trade to Emancipation. Finally, there will be some discussion of the impact of slave leisure on North American and Caribbean culture that continues to this day. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Vanderbilt University en
dc.subject Creolization -- Caribbean Area en
dc.subject Creolization -- United States en
dc.subject.lcsh Leisure -- Caribbean Area -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh Recreation -- United States -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh Recreation -- Caribbean Area -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh Slavery -- Social aspects -- United States en
dc.subject.lcsh Slavery -- Social aspects -- Caribbean Area en
dc.subject.lcsh African Americans -- Social life and customs en
dc.subject.lcsh Slaves -- United States -- Social life and customs en
dc.subject.lcsh Leisure -- United States -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh Caribbean Area -- Civilization -- African influences en
dc.subject.lcsh United States -- Civilization -- African influences en
dc.subject.lcsh Cultural fusion -- Caribbean Area -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh Cultural fusion -- United States -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh Blacks -- Recreation -- Caribbean Area -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh African Americans -- Recreation -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh Slaves -- Recreation -- Caribbean Area -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh Slaves -- Recreation -- United States -- History en
dc.subject.lcsh Blacks -- Caribbean Area -- Social life and customs en
dc.subject.lcsh Slaves -- Caribbean Area -- Social life and customs en
dc.title The Importation, Adaptation, and Creolization of Slave Leisure Forms in the Americas: 1600 to 1865 en
dc.type Paper en
dc.description.college College of Arts and Science en


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