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Comparative Observations on the Near Eastern Epic Traditions

dc.contributor.authorSasson, Jack M.
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-08T14:25:52Z
dc.date.available2011-03-08T14:25:52Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citation“Comparative Observations on the Near Eastern Epic Traditions," pp. 215-232 in John Miles Foley (editor), A Companion to Ancient Epic (Oxford: Blackwell's, 2006)en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/4772
dc.description.abstract"We must not doubt that stories were told and enjoyed long before humans learned how to transpose what the ear hears into what the eye sees. Whether brief or developed, transmitted verbatim or embellished, these tales were likely sung, chanted, intoned, or declaimed, with or without bodily accompaniments."en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofA Companion to Ancient Epic (Oxford: Blackwell's, 2006)
dc.subject.lcshMiddle Eastern literatureen_US
dc.subject.lcshPhilology -- Middle Eastern -- Historyen_US
dc.subject.lcshWriting -- Middle East -- Historyen_US
dc.subject.lcshMiddle East -- Languagesen_US
dc.titleComparative Observations on the Near Eastern Epic Traditionsen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.description.schoolDivinity Schoolen_US
dc.peerreviewedYesen_US


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