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A mind of its own: How a puppet’s reliability affects children’s beliefs about the puppeteer’s knowledge

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dc.contributor.advisor Troseth, Georgene L.
dc.contributor.author Menges, Kathryn
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-18T19:41:49Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-18T19:41:49Z
dc.date.issued 2011-04-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1803/4818
dc.description This paper culminates the PSY 2990 Honors Research Seminar, which lasted a total of 4 semesters. The author worked under the mentorship of Georgene Troseth, a professor in the Peabody Department of Psychology and Human Development. The paper describes research exploring whether 4-year-old children think a puppet has a mind separate from that of the puppeteer. The results illuminate preschoolers' understanding of puppets and how a puppet’s prior behavior may influence children’s beliefs about a puppeteer. en_US
dc.description.abstract This study assessed whether 4-year-old children think a puppet has a mind separate from that of the puppeteer. 64 children, 48-60 months, watched a puppet (operated by a visible person) and another person label 3 familiar objects. One person consistently labeled correctly and the other, incorrectly. Across children, we counterbalanced which of the labelers operated the puppet and whether the puppet was correct or incorrect. In the experimental (but not the control) group, the puppet then was passed to the other person (e.g., from the mis-labeler to the correct labeler, or vice versa). Then the puppeteer/puppet and the other person labeled a novel object with two different novel names. We asked children for the name of the novel object, examining whether the children used the puppet's or the person's label. We also asked follow-up questions to probe children's reasoning. The results illuminate preschoolers' understanding of puppets and how a puppet’s prior behavior may influence children’s beliefs about a puppeteer. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Thesis completed in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Honors Program in Psychological Sciences en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Vanderbilt University en_US
dc.subject puppets en_US
dc.subject children en_US
dc.subject preschool en_US
dc.subject trustworthiness en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Developmental psychology en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Puppets en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Reasoning in children en_US
dc.title A mind of its own: How a puppet’s reliability affects children’s beliefs about the puppeteer’s knowledge en_US
dc.title.alternative Puppet minds en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.school Vanderbilt University en_US
dc.description.department Psychological Sciences en_US


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