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Outsourcing and Offshoring in Special Collections: From Theory to Practice

dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Clifford B.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-06T21:50:12Z
dc.date.available2017-09-06T21:50:12Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn0066-0868
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1803/8427
dc.descriptionPaper presented at the Annual Conference of the American Theological Library Association (ATLA), Scottsdale, Ariz., June 27-30, 2012.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs the programs of special collections departments become more ambitious, the challenges of provisioning them become more complex. Whereas expectations of special collections librarians were once fairly uniform, position requirements are all over the map these days. Among other things, we may be expected to develop collections, process papers, arrange exhibitions, coordinate conferences, correspond with donor and grant agencies, publish scholarly articles, mark up finding aids, scan source materials, configure content management systems, and develop attractive digital interfaces. These increasing ambitions require us to think differently about how we approach not only our work but also the boundaries of our organizations. The question should not be what is most expedient but what is the most effective way to accomplish this range of tasks.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Theological Library Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJean and Alexander Heard Libraryen_US
dc.subjectSpecial Collectionsen_US
dc.subjectTransaction Cost Economicsen_US
dc.subject.lcshAcademic libraries--United Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshCoase, R. H. (Ronald Harry)en_US
dc.subject.lcshEconomicsen_US
dc.titleOutsourcing and Offshoring in Special Collections: From Theory to Practiceen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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